How to Start a Senior Care Franchise With No Experience

feature image of How to Start a Senior Care Franchise With No Experience

Think you need a wall studded with degrees to start a senior care business? Think again.

Today’s post explains how to start a successful senior care franchise with no experience, certifications, or post-secondary schooling required.

There has Never Been a Better Time to Start a Senior Care Franchise

By 2030, the senior population will double. In addition to people generally living longer in 2018, the senior population spike is largely attributed to the fact that the Baby Boomer generation is aging past 65 en masse. A senior population of this size is historically unprecedented, and its expected to push our long-term care capacity to the max.

Senior care literature is calling this the “2030 problem,” but it’s no problem for anybody interested in starting a senior care franchise. In fact, the lopsided supply-and-demand dynamic couldn’t be better.

Starting a Senior Care Franchise with No Experience

How could anyone run a senior homecare company without experience? Senior care is a competitive, trust-based industry in which clients expect premium custom care and smooth customer service. Startups will struggle to compete with established companies that have hard-earned reputations, strong online assets and visibility, and comprehensive care services.

So what are your options?

The obvious, long and painful route involves pursuing a multidisciplinary education. Complete training in nursing/caregiving, sales, web marketing, and business administration. Once you’ve paid off all your tuition and finished this decade-long training gauntlet, build a business plan and start building your senior care company from the ground up.

Clearly, this path requires a lot of sacrifice, and you won’t see a penny in profit for some time.

Consider the alternative. Starting a senior care franchise with Executive Care gets you:

  • Low, transparent start-up costs. Knowing and controlling your costs is a luxury that most startup don’t have–particularly if they lack experience.
    For as little as $99,750, you can start a senior care franchise. This franchise investment includes the franchise fee, computer equipment, signage and trade dress, office furniture/fixtures, prepaid rent, security deposit, and improvements; insurance and bonds, legal and incorporation fees; travel, lodging, and meals for your initial training; grand opening advertising, and about $44,000 of reserve working capital.
  • Access to a proven business model. Even with a multidisciplinary education, self-starters need to build a profitable business model. Theory and practice often differ, which means even a business school graduate might need time to iron out the details on a profitable plan. Unfortunately, trial and error can be costly, and startups rarely have much “mistake money” on hand.
    But Executive Care franchisees get access to a proven business model that has helped numerous business owners build successful companies with no prior experience in this industry.
  • Comprehensive training in senior care best practices. Many of our most successful franchisees entered into our training system with no prior experience. Training and support includes initial franchise training, ongoing on-site support, team development and continuing education, and back-office training programs. We will teach you everything you need to know and streamline the onboarding process so you can start making money sooner without compromising on quality.
  • A trusted brand reputation. Startups often struggle in obscurity for years. Even high-quality companies need time to build a reputation. But when you start a senior care company with the Executive Advantage, you hit the ground running with a sterling reputation in the long-term care industry.

Learn More about Starting a Senior Care Franchise with Executive Care

Read more about the Executive Advantage https://www.executivehomecarefranchise.com

References

Knickman, J. R., & Snell, E. K. (2002). The 2030 problem: caring for aging baby boomers. Health services research, 37(4), 849-884.